High-Speed Super-XX Panchromatic Safety Film

Dublin Core

Title

High-Speed Super-XX Panchromatic Safety Film

Creator

Description

After its introduction in 1923, Kodak’s 16mm film became the new standard for amateur filmmakers. The new film consisted of a base of non-combustible acetate plastic, a much safer alternative to the dangerously flammable cellulose nitrate used in 35mm. In fact, this safety measure was so prevalent that it helped earn 16mm film the name “safety film”. Safety film was used in Egypt by tourists, and by members of the elite to make home movies. Earlier types of film had also been used: Some of the earliest footage of AUC was shot on nitrate film, which poses particular challenges for preservation and digitization. Color footage of AUC dating to the 1930s and 40s is available online.

Relation

https://cdm15795.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/p15795coll23/id/15/rec/1

Date Created

circa 1950

Provenance

Acquired by AUC Libraries.

Files

kodak_magazine.jpg

Citation

Kodak Ltd., “High-Speed Super-XX Panchromatic Safety Film,” AUC Libraries, accessed August 14, 2022, https://auclibraries.omeka.net/items/show/29.